TREND ALERT: Regencycore Crafts

TREND ALERT: Regencycore Crafting

In the midst of a third lockdown in less than a year, it’s great to see the creative responses to this unique time.

 

Although the new Shondaland creation was ‘in the can’ before we were aware of the pandemic in February 2020, the 8-part Regency Drama Bridgerton has sparked a renewed fascination with traditional hobbies.

It seems 1.0’s sourdough bread making finally has a rival. Embroidery and other forms of needlework have swept us off our feet and left us cradling an embroidery hoop as a way of passing the time.

Not many of us have a grand Georgian drawing room in which to craft but there’s nothing to stop us re-creating the fantasy in a garden room filled with antique chairs and plinths for full effect.

For a match as perfect as a steamy period drama to a classic cover of modern song, look no further than a Malvern Garden Building for a sewing room – dashing Duke optional!


 

OWNER STORY: The Sewing Studio

Evie takes great pleasure in sewing in her mum’s Studio Pavilion:

“Textiles for me, has always been more of a hobby than work. When I was doing my textiles GCSE course, I used my creative skills as a release and a detox – to get away from the crazy workload. Now, studying textiles at a higher level (A Level) is more of an enjoyment than a stressor.

I take pride in producing my sketchbooks and designing clothes. Often my mum helps me with the technical aspects of my garments creation which not only brings us closer but gives me further insight into the world of textiles.”

Evie’s mum, Jane says:

“I used to make some of my own clothes as a teenager and always like having a creative project on the go. Nowadays with work and family commitments I do that less, but I’m really pleased my daughter has shown such an interest and talent in designing and sewing textiles.”

In a word, Jane describes life and sewing before the Studio Pavilion as “cramped!”. The sewing machine was a regular feature on the kitchen table surrounded by piles of fabric.

The family of four (including two teenagers) has lived in their Victorian terrace in South East London for 13 years. Jane admits their home and garden requirements have evolved over time.

The garden is typical for a terraced house, relatively small south facing patio, lawn and borders but nothing really grew at the end so over the years was used as a place for a playhouse, compost bin, shed, football goal and general dumping ground.

As the back of the garden wasn’t used to its full potential, they decided to add some decking and a multi-purpose garden room and shed in the hopes it would give them some much needed extra space as the family’s needs changed.

The garden studio has been a great way of extending the living space and the adjoining shed keeps the garden tools and mower organised and out of sight. Jane’s been surprised by how much they’ve used the garden studio:

“The biggest surprise (and delight) is that it’s been so popular with all the family. My daughter has had parties in there, I have enjoyed a relaxing sundowner or two and it’s now a great space for sewing.”

For more photos of the sewing studio and Jane and Evie’s home, take a look at their Instagram page @come_home_to_no_57.


 

Artisan Studio: Free Motion Embroidery Inspired by Nature

As further proof that Malvern Garden Buildings make ideal needlework rooms. Embroideress Louise Gardiner used a 14’ x 10’ Flat Roof Hanley as her artisan workshop for the week of RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2018.

Louise draws freely with thread on a domestic sewing machine to create dynamic embroidered illustrations, large-scale artworks and commemorative capes.

She layers appliqué, inks and paints with intense stitching and hand-sewn beads producing works that shimmer with magical depth and catch the changing light. Every piece is meticulously made, labour-intensive and energetic.

” My experience as an artist, designer and maker has shown me embroidery’s power to inspire sharing, energy and creativity. Through my work, I aim to create new opportunities for positive interaction with this authentic and exciting medium, to celebrate ‘the feminine’ and our connection with nature.”

Louise Gardiner, Ambassador for the Power of Stitch