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Artisan Profile: Meet Corrie Bain

On the run-up to Chelsea Flower Show 2019, we will be shining a light on each of the artisans chosen to exhibit in the Artisan Area. This week we were thrilled to chat with ceramic artist, Corrie Bain.


 

CORRIE BAIN

HAVE YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO BE A CERAMICS ARTIST?

Yes, as a child I was surrounded by artists and ceramics, and I enjoyed drawing, painting, or making things with clay. I decided to study a degree at Edinburgh College of Art, and was drawn to conceptual sculpture and 3D design. After experimenting with many different materials, I felt that clay was by far the most versatile medium to express ideas with, so I specialised in Ceramics. Art school opened up an entirely new world full of infinite possibilities, and since then I´ve never looked back.


HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR WORK?

I use the vessel as a sculptural form of expression, and the surface as a canvas for my drawings. The ceramics I make are related to an ongoing exploration of visual dynamics, kinetics and movement. My work is hand built with porcelain clay using sculptural methods gradually developed over the past 20 years.


WHERE DO YOU WORK AND HOW DOES THIS SPACE FEED INTO YOUR WORK?

I was born in the most northern point of Scotland in a remote area called Caithness, and raised in a village on a Greek island called Euboea. After working in Korea and Eastern Asia for several years, I now live and work in Barcelona, where I own a ceramics school. I have a private studio at home to make work for exhibitions in galleries, next to a garden where I grow my own plants and vegetables, which is quite condusive to my work. Barcelona is a culturally diverse, creative and vibrant city, fitting perfectly with my way of life.

WHAT INSPIRES YOUR DESIGN?

I find inspiration from Cymatics, the scientific study of wave phenomena, microscopic imagery of seed pods, micro-organisms, pollen and fractals. Mark-making, texture and decoration are equally as important as form. I attempt to make pieces that allude to a sense of weightlessness, in search of rhythm and balance, fundamental elements of nature.


WHAT PIECE HAS BEEN THE MOST FUN TO CREATE SO FAR?

A large and very challenging porcelain piece called Protozoa, will be on display at Chelsea Flower Show. It´s a bespoke sculptural vessel made by hand with French Limoges Porcelain. The form is based on microscopic images of the micro-organism protozoa. Its surface is left un-glazed to show the natural tone and translucency of the porcelain. It measures over 60cm, took 3 months to make, working 12 hours per day, 7 days a week. Each decorative element (that looks like a little flower) is added individually, in a slow, intricate and meditative process. I enjoyed making it immensely.


WHAT ARE YOUR HOPES FOR CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW THIS YEAR?

I´d like to make new connections with artists, gardeners, meet interesting people from all walks of life, and find a few more galleries to exhibit my work in London.